Turmeric-Avocado Deviled Eggs

This is the second batch of deviled eggs that I made for the Ostara Potluck I attended.

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The first batch was the Pink Deviled Eggs I wrote about a few days ago.

Unlike the pink eggs, which used leftover beet brine, I made a fermented turmeric brine especially for these eggs.  They will need to be started at least 2 weeks in advance of when you want to serve them in order for you to have time to ferment the turmeric brine.

But the results are worth it!

Turmeric adds the yellow colour to the outside of the eggs, and is also a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflamatory.

The avocado not only provides the green creamyness to the yolk filling, it also provides some heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, a ton of nutrients and yet more anti-inflammatory properties.

These are a stunning contribution to a potluck, but also make great snacks and would look wonderful on an Easter buffet table.  They would also be good for breakfast or in packed lunches.

You could also just eat the turmeric pickled eggs whole without going to the trouble of cutting and filling them with the avocado mixture.

Whole eggs/egg whites are an AIP stage 2 reintroduction, so if you are following the AIP plan, you will need to wait until you have successfully reintroduced egg yolks and egg whites before eating these.  When reintroducing foods on the AIP, I recommend this guide.

Turmeric Avocado Deviled Eggs

Makes 24 halved eggs

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To make the turmeric brine:

  • 2 TBSP pink Himalayan salt
  • 1 small carrot – sliced – peel if not organic
  • 2″fresh root ginger – sliced thinly
  • 2″ fresh turmeric root – sliced thinly
  • 4-5 slices fresh horseradish root
  • 3 cloves garlic – peeled
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 cabbage leaf (to weigh down the veggies to ensure they all stay underneath the brine)

To make the eggs

  • 1 dozen eggs – preferably free-range/pastured/soy-free

To make the filling

  • 1 large ripe avocado – peeled and diced
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley – chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh basil – chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh chives – chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme – chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

The first thing that needs to be done is that the brine needs to be made and fermented.  This needs to be started at least 2 weeks before you want to serve the eggs.

Take all the brine ingredients, except for the cabbage, and put them in a quart mason jar.  Add filtered water to cover and mix well to dissolve the salt.  Tuck the cabbage leaf on top of the veggies to hold them down under the brine.  If necessary weigh this down with a small jar or shot-glass filled with brine.

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Cover and leave to stand at room temperature for at least 7 days.  It may get fizzy and bubbly as the naturally occurring cultures start to ferment the sugars in the veggies and herbs.  This is normal.  Open the lid every now and again to release the gas.

Once the brine is fermented to your liking, strain out all the solids, reserving the fermented brine.

Take the dozen eggs, and place them in a pan with cold water.  Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Drain and place in cold water.

Once the eggs have cooled enough to handle, peel off the shells and pack the eggs in a large mason jar.

Carefully pour over the brine to cover the eggs.

Place the eggs in the fridge and leave to “pickle” for 5-7 days.

To make the deviled eggs…

Drain the eggs from the brine.

Cut each egg in half lengthwise and carefully scoop out the yolk.

Mash the yolks with the avocado.

Place the herbs, garlic, lemon juice and the olive oil in a blender or food processor and puree to a paste.

Add the herb puree to the egg yolks and avocado and mix well.

Season to taste with sea salt.

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Carefully spoon or pipe the green mixture back into the egg whites and arrange on a serving platter.

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Two Appetizer Recipes – AIP/Paleo

I went to a potluck last night…

Normally, I hate potlucks with a passion – usually there is very little that I can eat, and there is also always the risk that the few things that I can eat have been cross-contaminated simply by people not realizing that dropping crumbs or grated cheese or whatever all over other dishes (or even worse, using the spoon from one dish to serve themselves from another) means that there will be people who either cannot eat the food, or who may react badly.

For this particular potluck, I decided that I was going to make 2 dishes that I could eat – both appetizers…

And I made sure that they were placed right at the back of the table where there would be no accidental cross contamination from other foods – in fact, the only other foods around my dishes were some salad and some cut-up fruit

Both of these dishes make wonderful appetizers, but are also great to pack in lunch-boxes (ensure that they contents are kept cold), or for snacks…  and of course they are wonderful to bring to a potluck.

I really could have made more than I did – both went very fast…  my dishes were the only ones  that were empty at the end of the night!

Both of these recipes are 100% AIP as long as the bacon that is used is also AIP (be careful – some cures use “spices” that could contain nightshades).  If possible, try to use bacon that comes from pastured pork, and I like to avoid the ones that contain added (chemical) nitrates as I prefer more natural cures that contain salt, sugar and celery juice (which does contain nitrates, but in a more natural form).  I prefer to use thin-cut bacon for these recipes as it does not take so long to crisp up.

The first recipe I made was Bacon Wrapped Prunes, that I stuffed with a home-made chicken liver pate.

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If you choose to buy a pate instead of making your own, read the ingredients carefully to be sure that it does not contain any non-AIP ingredients, or those that you do not tolerate well.  Most bought pate’s will contain dairy and non-AIP spices.  Of course if you are not AIP, or you tolerate the ingredients well, then that is not a problem…

The prunes, as I discovered made for a VERY rich mouthful when combined with the pate and the bacon…  one or two are enough for most people.  But they are so delicious with the salty bacon combining with the sweetness of the prunes and the rich creaminess of the pate.

Pate Stuffed Bacon Wrapped Prunes

Makes 20-25 individual “bites”

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  • 6 TBSP Chicken Liver Pate – preferably homemade
  • 375g (aprox. 13oz) pack of bacon (preferably made from pastured pork)
  • 20-30 prunes
  • wooden cocktail sticks

Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C).  Line a shallow-rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper (this makes for an easier clean-up).

Cut each strip of bacon into 3, crosswise across the strip, and lie them out on a cutting board.

Take your prunes, and stuff each one with ¼tsp chicken liver pate.  This can get messy fast!  Just try to keep your hands as clean as you can.

Lie the stuffed prunes at one end of each strip of bacon, then roll the bacon around the stuffed prunes, securing the end with a cocktail stick.

Lie the prunes on the prepared baking sheet with the free end at the bottom (it helps to stop them unrolling while they cook.

Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes until the bacon is crispy, turning at the 15 minute mark.

Remove to a wire rack to allow any fat to drain off.

These are good served hot or cold…  I served them cold at the pot-luck.

The second appetizer that I made was Bacon Wrapped Shrimp.

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These are really easy to make, and taste delicious.  They were the first thing to disappear at the potluck!

Bacon Wrapped Shrimp

Makes 25-30 individual “bites”

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  • 349g (aprox 12oz) bag of peeled (tail on) raw shrimp (thawed if frozen).  I used 31-40 count shrimp
  • 375g (aprox 13oz) pack bacon (preferably from pastured pork)

Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C).  Line a shallow-rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper (this makes for an easier cleanup).

Cut each slice of bacon into half lengthwise, and then half again crosswise to give 4 long thin strips of bacon.

Take a piece of bacon, and starting at the head-end, wrap it around the shrimp, ending at the tail.

Place the wrapped shrimp, end-side down, on the prepared baking sheet.

Repeat for the rest of the shrimp and the bacon.

Bake the shrimp for 10 minutes in the oven.  Remove and drain off any liquid that has accumulated.

Turn the oven to broil (grill if you are in the UK), and cook the shrimp to crisp the bacon on both sides (this took around 5 minutes per side).

Place the crisped shrimp on a wire rack to drain off any extra fat.

Serve hot or cold (I served these cold at the pot-luck).

Make lots!  They go fast….  But in the unlikely event that there are leftovers, store them in the fridge to eat as snacks.

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