Chocolate Fat Bombs

Hubby is really struggling at the moment…  he feels constantly hungry, constant carb cravings, and it is not helping him with his weight loss or trying to avoid gluten (because he ends up eating chocolate bars from the vending machine at work).

So I decided to try upping his fat content, and as a result made the following fat bombs for him to eat in lieu of those carb and sugar laden chocolate bars.

These are full of good fats – and hopefully will help curb those cravings.

Chocolate and almonds are an AIP stage 2 reintroduction.  When reintroducing foods on the AIP, I recommend this guide.

Chocolate Fat Bombs

makes 24 individual bars

fat1

  • 2 cups unsweetened dried coconut
  • ½ cup almond butter
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup butter
  • ¼ cup raw honey (ours comes from Buzz Honey)
  • ¼ cup cocoa (unsweetened)
  • ½ cup sliced almonds
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

The first thing you need to do is to put the coconut into your food processor.  You are going to leave this running until you get some coconut butter…  depending on how powerful your machine is, it could take anything from a few minutes up to about 10 minutes.  Just leave it running until it starts to clump together and the flakes are starting to break down and resemble nutbutter.

Now add the almond butter, coconut oil, butter, honey and cocoa.  Blend until evenly mixed.

Add the slivered almonds, cinnamon, ginger and vanilla and pulse until evenly mixed.  You don’t want to totally break up the almonds – they are there to provide texture to the finished bar.

Scrape into a loaf tin (I used a silicone one for ease of turning out, if you have a metal one you may need to line it with cling-wrap to be able to get the finished bars out of the tin).

Place in the freezer until frozen solid and then turn out and cut into bars.

I cut the loaf into 12 evenly sized bars and then cut each bar in half again to make 24 small chocolate bars.

fat2

Wrap each bar in cling-wrap and store in the fridge until needed.  They will go squishy if unrefrigerated.

I don’t normally work out the nutritional profile of my recipes, but in this case I was interested in the macro-nutrient profile (specifically, I wanted to know how much fat and protein was in there) so I ran this through the recipe calculator on spark people.

It came up with the following (note this is not complete – I was not interested in all the minutae of the micronutrients for this recipe as it is a snack only)

Serving size  1 bar (1/24 of the recipe)

Calories 248

Total fat 24.4g

Saturated fat 16.7g

Polyunsaturated fat 1.5g

Monounsaturated fat 3.7g

Total Carbs 6.2g

Fiber 3.7g

Sugars 4.4g

Protein 2.8g

Don’t be put off by the high levels of saturated fats in this, there has been research that effectively debunks the myth that dietary saturated fat plays a major role in heart disease.  The main thing is that this is fairly low in the inflammatory polyunsaturated fats but still contains some of the beneficial monounsaturated fats. And the role of all these fats is to fill you up, keep you full and combat those carb/sugar cravings.

It is relatively low in carbs as well – not only is 6.2g not all that much, by the time you deduct the unavailable dietary fiber you end up with an available carb figure of  only 2.5g per serving…  a tiny amount really – hardly enough to cause an insulin spike.   And the protein content was 2.8g per serving.  Not a huge amount, but bear in mind that this is a snack designed to combat cravings, NOT a meal replacement….

Hubby says that these are really effective at helping combat his sugar cravings when he is at work.

And I have to say (having licked the spatula after scraping it out of the food processor), it tastes delicious!  Not overly sweet, with a nice chocolatey flavour and an appealing nutty texture.

I am guessing that if you wanted to make this ultra-low-carb (to fit in with something like the Atkins diet, or similar ultra-low-carb ketogenic diets), you could substitute artificial sweeteners or stevia for the honey…  for ourselves we prefer to be more natural, avoiding any artificial sweeteners and I don’t like the way stevia tastes… besides, I don’t really think 2.5g of available carbs in a snack is all that bad in the big scheme of things really…..