Coconut Whipped Cream

This is a wonderful topping for any AIP or Paleo desserts.  It is 100% dairy free.

Light and creamy, it really does resemble whipped cream in texture

I use this a lot to top fresh berries as a simple dessert, but I have also used it to top my Choco-Nanacado Mousse and my Avocado-Nana Raspberry Parfait.  It is also wonderful spooned over fresh berries to make a simple dessert or snack.

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Sometimes, just that little bit of creaminess makes all the difference.us

You do need to plan in advance to make this as you need to chill both the bowl and the coconut milk in the fridge.

This cream is made from the thick layer that separates out at the top of the coconut milk when it is stored in the fridge.

If you are using homemade coconut milk, this will happen naturally.

If you are using a can of coconut milk, you will need to ensure that it does not contain any gums or emulsifiers as these will prevent the thick layer from separating.  You also need full fat coconut milk.

Coconut Whipped Cream

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  • 1 batch of homemade coconut milk or 1 can of full fat coconut milk
  • 1 tsp honey or maple syrup (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp alcohol-free vanilla extract or 1/4 tsp vanilla powder (optional)

Place the coconut milk in the fridge for at least 4 hours to chill and to let the thick creamy layer separate out.  At the same time, chill the bowl you intend to mix this in.

Carefully scoop the thick layer off the top of the more watery layer underneath.  The watery layer can be saved to add to smoothies.

If using canned coconut milk, it is easier to open the bottom of the can and pour the watery layer off and then scoop out the thick creamy layer.

Place the coconut cream in the chilled bowl, and add the optional sweetener and vanilla if using it.  Whisk using a hand mixer for 1-2 minutes until light and fluffy.

Chill in the fridge for 1 hour before using.

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Serve spooned over whatever takes your fancy….  it is even good to top coffee (if you have managed to reintroduce it – Coffee is a stage 1 reintroduction).  I also use it on top of a carob hot “chocolate”.

Rosemary Roasted Roots

This is another great side-dish that is perfect to make when you are roasting something in the oven.

You can use any cooking fat that you have – I happened to use lard in this, but beef tallow, coconut oil or even olive oil would work perfectly well.

This recipe is 100% AIP compliant.

Rosemary Roasted Roots

serves 2-3

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  • 4 small beets – peeled and cut into quarters
  • 3 small parsnips – peeled and cut into sticks
  • 3 large carrots – peeled and cut into sticks
  • 3 tbsp lard (or other cooking fat of choice) – melted
  • 1 tbsp fresh rosemary – chopped
  • sea salt to taste

Peel and cut the vegetables so that they are all approximately the same size.

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Place the veggies on a roasting tray and drizzle over the melted lard.  Sprinkle over the rosemary and season with salt.

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Toss the veggies, then roast them in a 350°F oven for 50 minutes until browned and tender.

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I served these along side my Moroccan Lemon and Herb Roasted Chicken, Lemon and Thyme Braised Leeks and some steamed broccoli.

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Lemon and Thyme Braised Leeks

This is a lovely side-dish to serve with roast chicken or fish.

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It really make the best of leeks, which can be an under-appreciated vegetable.

It is worth giving leeks a try though, as they are very good for you.

Leeks are a good source of vitamins A and K, along with healthy amounts of folic acid, niacin, riboflavin, magnesium, and thiamin. The B vitamins in leeks, in particular, may support heart health by keeping levels of homocysteine in balance (elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease, blood clots, and stroke).  They also contain small amounts of important minerals such as potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and selenium.

Leeks also provide a concentrated source of antioxidants, even when compared to other antioxidant-rich foods, and the allicin has been shown to reduce cholesterol production in the liver, and has also been found to have anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities.

This recipe is 100% AIP compliant.

Lemon and Thyme Braised Leeks

serves 2

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Trim off the tough outer leaves from the leeks and discard them.  Cut the leeks in half and then trim them to aproximately 7″ long.

Soak the leeks in cold water for at least 15 minutes to remove any grit or dirt.

In a heavy skillet, melt the bacon fat.  Drain the leeks, and add them to the pan.  Allow the leeks to cook for 5 minutes, tossing occasionally.

Add the bone broth, lemon zest and thyme.

Allow the broth to reduce, tossing the leeks occasionally until they are tender.

Season to taste with sea salt.

I served these leeks along side my Moroccan Lemon and Herb Roasted Chicken, some steamed broccoli and Rosemary Roasted Roots.

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Moroccan Lemon and Herb Roast Chicken

This is my newest favourite way to cook a chicken…

Stuffed with herbs and Moroccan lemons.

It tastes wonderful and the meat is always juicy and tender…

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Mmmmmmmm  Yum!

Moroccan lemons are lemons that have been preserved using salt.  They are very easy to make, but you can also purchase them.

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I use the recipe from here to make mine, but if you want to purchase some, I can recommend these:

The lemons add both a salty tang and a lemon flavour to the chicken.

This recipe is 100% AIP compliant.

Moroccan Lemon and Herb Roasted Chicken

serves 4-6

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  • 4-6lb whole chicken
  • ½ Moroccan preserved lemon
  • 2 TBSP extra-virgin olive oil
  • sea salt to taste.
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 4 sprigs fresh sage
  • 4-5 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 4 sprigs fresh parsley

The first thing you need to do is to take half of a preserved lemon and rub it all over the skin of the chicken.  Then stuff the lemon up inside the cavity.  Drizzle the skin of the chicken with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt.

Place the garlic cloves, bay leaves, half of the rosemary, sage, thyme and parsley inside the cavity.

Chop the remaining herbs finely and sprinkle over the chicken.

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Sit the chicken, breast side up, in a roasting tin, and roast in a 350°F  oven for 20 minutes per lb until the chicken is cooked and the internal temperature is at least 165°F when measured with a meat thermometer.

Allow the chicken to rest for 10 minutes before carving and serving.

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I served this chicken with some rosemary roasted root vegetables, steamed broccoli and lemon and thyme braised leeks.

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Shared at:  Mostly Homemade Mondays, Thank Goodness it’s Monday, Fat Tuesday, Tuesdays with a Twist, Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, Gluten Free Wednesdays, Allergy Free Wednesdays, Paleo AIP Recipe Round Table #69, Gluten Free Fridays, Pure Blog Love, Awesome Life Friday, Natural Family Friday, Real Food Friday, Simply Natural Saturday, Lets Get Real, Savouring Saturdays, Simple Saturdays, Hearth and Soul Hop

Choco-Bananacado Mousse – AIP/Vegan/Raw

A chocolate craving the other night, and a need for some comfort food led me to develop the recipe for this mousse

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It actually does not contain any chocolate – I used carob instead.

This recipe is 100% AIP, it is also vegan and raw as it contains no eggs.

But despite this, it is just as satisfying and “chocolatey” as any chocolate mousse I have ever tried.  It is also very rich and filling.

Choco-Bananacado Mousse

Serves 2

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  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 1 ripe banana
  • 3 TBSP carob powder
  • ¼ vanilla powder
  • pinch of Himalayan salt
  • 1 TBSP coconut oil
  • 1 TBSP raw honey
  • 3 TBSP coconut cream (the thick layer at the top of a can of coconut milk)
  • Whipped coconut cream and fresh raspberries to garnish (optional)

This is a very easy recipe that takes only seconds to whip up…  perfect for when you need a “chocolate” fix in a hurry.

Peel the avocado and remove the pit.  Place the avocado flesh in a food processor with the banana, carob powder, vanilla powder, salt, coconut oil, coconut cream and honey.

Process on high for a minute or two until the mixture is smooth.

Transfer to two individual serving dishes or jars.

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This can be chilled in the fridge or consumed immediately.  Chilling in the fridge will result in a firm texture.

Serve garnished with whipped coconut cream and fresh fruit if you like.

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It is delicious eaten just as it is though.

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Hidden Liver Meatloaf & Simple Gravy

I am trying to make an effort to include more organ meat/offal in our diets simply because it is so good for us.  It is also very cheap, and a great way to keep the grocery budget under control.

I have been reading a lot lately on IPMG about people grinding up liver and hiding it in other foods, usually because either they don’t like the taste, or to hide the “yuck” factor so that kids will eat it.  I am lucky in that my kids will willingly eat liver, and Hubby and I both love it, but sometimes it is nice to have a change.

I was already planning on making one of Hubby’s favourite meals – Meatloaf, so I decided that I could add the liver to that.

Here is a warning – when you grind liver in the food processor it goes very sloppy.  I just mixed that sloppy, wet mess into my regular meatloaf recipe.  It made the mixture a little wetter than normal, but it cooked up OK.

The liver in the meatloaf along with the ground beef, pork and bacon was delicious!  It really enhanced the flavour, although I don’t think it was really “Hidden”.  I could tell from the flavour that it was in there, but that could be because I left the liver just a little bit chunky instead of blending it until it was smooth.

This recipe is a stage 2 reintroduction because it contains flaxmeal (stage 2 reintroduction) and black pepper (stage 1 reintroduction).  When reintroducing foods on the AIP, I recommend this guide.

To make this recipe 100% AIP compliant simply leave out the flaxmeal and black pepper.

Hidden Liver Meatloaf

Makes 2 – each serves 4

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  • 1lb ground beef
  • 1lb ground pork
  • 1lb beef liver
  • 6 rashers of bacon
  • 2 sticks of celery
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 tbsp fat of choice (I used some bacon fat in this, but you could use coconut oil, tallow or lard)
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley – chopped
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper (omit the pepper if sensitive to it or strict AIP)
  • 2 tbsp coconut aminos
  • ¼ cup flax seed meal (omit if strict AIP)

The first thing you do is to dice up all the veggies.  I chop them in the food processor until coarsely chopped.  Don’t let them get to a puree though.

Melt the fat in a skillet and add the chopped veggies, and cook over a medium heat until tender and starting to brown.  Now add the garlic and herbs.  Season well with salt and pepper.

While the veggies are cooking grind up the liver in the food processor.  As I mentioned earlier, it will get very sloppy.  I left mine just a little chunky.

Transfer the liver to a mixing bowl along with the ground pork and beef, and use the food processor to grind up the bacon.  If you try to do this with the liver, the liver will be over-ground before the bacon is ground up small enough.

Add the bacon to the mixing bowl along with the veggies.  Season well with salt, pepper, coconut aminos and fish sauce.  Stir in the flax seed meal if using it.  It can easily be left out if you want to make this recipe AIP, but it does help the meatloaf to firm up, and it thickens the mixture a little.

Mix the ingredients together – I find this is easiest with my hands.  Then transfer the mixture to 2 large loaf tins.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F.  Cook the meatloaves in the oven for 1 – 1½hours until cooked through.  Check the temperature using a meat thermometer if you are not sure.  You want the internal temperature to be 70°C (160°F).

Take the meatloaf out of the oven and allow to rest for a few minutes while you make the gravy.

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As far as I am concerned, good meatloaf NEEDS gravy!  As well as the gravy (recipe below), I also served mashed rutabaga and sauteed kale with this.

Simple Gravy

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  • 2 onions  – diced
  • 2 tbsp fat of choice – I used some leftover bacon fat
  • 1 cup good bone broth
  • Any pan juices or drippings from the meat (I used the juice out of the meatloaf)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste (omit the pepper if sensitive to it or strict AIP)
  • 1 tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 – 2 tsp tapioca flour –  optional

Take the onions and cook them over a medium heat in the fat until they are very soft and caremelized.  Don’t stint on the browning as this is what gives colour to the gravy.

Once the onions are browned to your satisfaction, add the bone broth and any meat juices you have available, season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the coconut aminos.  Simmer for 5 minutes, then blend with an imersion blender.  The blended onions help to thicken the gravy as well as adding flavour.  If you feel it needs a little extra thickening, add the tapioca flour, mix well and simmer for a couple of minutes.

Serve at once.

This gravy is great to serve with any meats – you don’t even need the pan juices if you don’t have any.