Simple Small Batch Sauerkraut

I don’t own a large fermentation crock, so I make my sauerkraut in small batches in mason jars.

It does take a bit more work to do it this way because you have to make and fill several small jars rather than just packing it into one large fermentation crock or jar.

But I have a large number of wide-mouthed mason jars, so this method works well for me.

I posted about my vegetable ferments that I made a while ago, and sauerkraut was part of this batch.

I made a batch with red cabbage and another batch with green/white cabbage.  You could use either or even mix the two.

I don’t add any spices to my kraut, but if you are not AIP and like the flavour, you could add some caraway or fennel seeds to provide a slight aniseed flavour.

Sauerkraut is very good for you – it has been shown that a small amount of sauerkraut will provide you with far more healthy probiotic bacteria than even some of the very high quality probiotic supplements.

This makes it a very valued addition to any diet as far as I am concerned.

But in addition to it’s probiotic content, sauerkraut is a good source of vitamins A and C, and has all the health benefits of the other cruciferous vegetables.

It is also very tasty – tangy and slightly salty.

Simple Small Batch Sauerkraut

makes 1 quart sized mason jar

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  • ½ head of cabbage (you could double up the recipe and use the entire head if you prefer).  Either red cabbage or white, or a mixture of the two – it really does not matter.
  • 2 tbsp sea salt

Take your cabbage and remove the core and some of the outside leaves.  Reserve one or two leaves.

Now shred the cabbage finely – I like to do this in my food processor to save time, but you could use a knife.

Place the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and sprinkle the salt evenly over the surface.

Now you need to pound the heck out of the cabbage – I use the end of my rolling pin, but you could use a meat pounder or even your fists.  What you need to do is to break down some of the structure of the cabbage and make it release it’s liquid as this forms the brine that will preserve your kraut.

Pounding the cabbage can take upwards of 10 minutes, and you want it to be really juicy when you squeeze it.

After this, transfer the cabbage to a wide mouthed mason jar, packing it down well with your fists.

If you have pounded it enough, you should see the brine starting to rise up over the surface to cover the cabbage.  If not enough brine rises up, no worries, just mix up a little more brine (2 tbsp salt in 1 quart of water) and pour that over the surface.

Now take the reserved cabbage leaves and lay them on the surface of the cabbage, pushing them underneath the brine.  These will stop lots of little bits of cabbage from rising to the surface, which will help prevent mold forming.

After this, I like to weight the cabbage leaves down – I use the very small jelly-sized mason jars as they fit perfectly inside a wide-mouthed mason jar.  I fill them up with a little brine to help hold them down and prevent them from floating.

And finally, screw the lid on the mason jar.

Leave your sauerkraut to ferment for 2-3 weeks, opening the jar to release any gas every day.  I like to taste it towards the end of the fermentation period at this point as well.

The sauerkraut is ready when it tastes good to you.  In cold weather it may take longer to ferment than it will in the summer.

If you don’t think it is ready, reseal and leave it for a few more days.  Some people like to ferment their kraut for several weeks (6-8), but I prefer it “younger”.

Once you think it is ready, transfer it to the fridge as this will slow down the fermentation process.  Now it will keep for months.

If you make sure that your cabbage is well submerged under the brine, you should have very few problems with spoilage or mold formation – but in the unlikely event that it does mold, throw the whole lot out.  Mold produces toxins that can spread rapidly throughout the entire jar of sauerkraut, and you cannot just scrape it off the surface.

When I make red cabbage sauerkraut, it looks like this:

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And the green cabbage sauerkraut looks like this:

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Because this is a live culture, I don’t really recommend that you cook your sauerkraut – it will be tasty if cooked, but it won’t contain any of the probiotic bacteria as they are killed by high temperatures.

I most often eat my sauerkraut raw – either with sausage patties for breakfast:

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Or with other meats/fish/eggs (this is pulled pork)

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I also sometimes add it to coleslaw to make a lacto-fermented slaw.

Creamy Turmeric Chicken – Paleo/AIP

This delicious recipe consists of chicken breasts cooked in a creamy sauce that is made from a mixture of coconut milk, onion and some AIP-friendly spices.

The creamy sauce prevents the boneless, skinless chicken from drying out in the oven.

I bought some fresh turmeric roots from the farmers market, and decided to use some in this dish.

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Turmeric is the spice that gives curry it’s yellow colour, and it has been used in India as both a spice and a medicinal herb for thousands of years.

Turmeric contains curcumin, which is a powerful anti-inflammatory and it is also an antioxidant, meaning that it is something worth considering including in your diet.

The blend of spices that I used in this recipe give the sauce a comforting warmth, but it is not a spicy sauce.

This recipe is 100% AIP, and suitable for the elimination phase.

I served this over cauliflower kale rice.

Creamy Turmeric Chicken

serves 6

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  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 1 onion – chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic – crushed
  • 4 tbsp grated root ginger
  • 15g (½ oz) fresh turmeric root – peeled and chopped.  Use 1 tsp dried turmeric if this is not available
  • sea salt to taste
  • 6 skinless, boneless chicken breasts

Preheat the oven to 190°/375°F.

Place the onion, garlic, ginger and turmeric in a blender and blend until smooth.

Season well with salt.

Arrange the chicken in a single layer in an ovenproof baking dish.

Pour the coconut milk mixture over the chicken.

Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes until the chicken is cooked through.

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Serve over cauliflower rice, spooning the sauce over the chicken.

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Shared at Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable #35

Grilled Pork Chops With Apple, Bacon And Onion

This was such a delicious dinner that A cooked the other night – it was hot, Hot, HOT, and we were dreading turning on the stove to make dinner.

Using the outdoor grill to cook the chops and then serving them with a salad was a no-brainer.

And it worked perfectly.

This recipe is both Paleo and AIP-friendly if you omit the black pepper.

Don’t be put off by the fact that this recipe serves 6 people.  If you need to feed fewer, just use fewer pork chops – one per person is ideal.  The apple bacon and onion mixture is also easy to scale down, but I would not bother – it tastes delicious with all sorts of other meats, or even on its own, and is just as good cold from the fridge as it is hot.

Grilled Pork Chops With Apple, Bacon And Onion

serves 6

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  • 6 pork loin chops (about 6oz each)
  • sea salt to taste
  • a small amount of melted coconut oil to brush the meat
  • 2 large onions – sliced
  • 6 rashers of bacon – sliced
  • 2 large apples – cored and sliced
  • leaves from 1 sprig of fresh rosemary – chopped
  • leaves from 1 sprig of fresh sage – chopped
  • leaves from 1-2 sprigs of fresh thyme – chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic – crushed

Preheat your grill to a medium high temperature.

While the grill is heating, take the chops and brush them with a little coconut oil.  Season well with salt.

Place the chops on the grill, and cook for 5-7 minutes on each side until the chops have an internal temperature of 77°C/170°F.  If you have got the temperature of the grill just right, you should have some lovely sear marks on the meat.

Remove the chops from the grill and keep warm.

Now you need to place your cast iron skillet directly on the grill and turn the heat up a bit.

Add the bacon to the pan and allow to cook down and release it’s fat.  Add the onions to the bacon fat and saute until starting to brown a little.  Add in the apples, the herbs and the garlic and cook until everything is soft, and gently caramelized.  This should take no more than 5-10 minutes, by which time the chops will have rested.

Serve the apple, onion and bacon mixture along with the grilled pork chops.

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I like to serve this with a brightly coloured salad such as my Lacto-Fermented Beet And Carrot Salad.

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If you do not have an outside grill, you could easily cook these chops on the stove on a grill-pan.

Lacto-Fermented Beet And Carrot Salad

I made this vibrantly coloured salad to use up some of the lacto-fermented beets that I had leftover from making Beet Kvass.

I don’t like to waste anything (It is the thrifty Yorkshire Woman in me!), and I did not want to throw the beets away after I had made the kvass, but I also did not want to just eat the chunks of beet.

This salad was a perfect compromise, and went very well with some pork chops that I had cooked for dinner.

This recipe is both Paleo and AIP Friendly.  And thanks to the lacto-fermented beets, it is full of healthy, gut-friendly probiotics.

And it is so pretty!

Lact0-Fermented Beet And Carrot Salad

serves 4-6

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  • Lacto-fermented beets – I used about 2 cups of chunks in total
  • 3-4 large carrots
  • 1 bunch green onions
  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic from the jar of lacto-fermented beets (optional)

Grate the beets and place them in a large bowl – I recommend using a food processor for this or you will end up with red stained hands.

Peel and grate the carrots and add to the beets in the bowl.

Trim the green onions and chop them.  Add to the beets and carrot in the bowl

If you like, you can now take 1-2 cloves of garlic that was fermented with the beets and crush them.  This step is entirely optional.

Place the apple cider vinegar and olive oil in a small mason jar along with the crushed garlic if using it.

Shake the jar well to mix the contents, then pour over the salad and mix until it is all incorporated.

Serve at once.

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I like to pile this on top of shredded green lettuce leaves – the green of the lettuce provides an attractive colour contrast with the purple/red and orange of the carrots and beets.

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This particular salad was also served with some pork chops that I had cooked on the grill and served with apples, onions and bacon.

Shared at Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable #35

Shared at Thrifty Thursday week 69

Tostones – Green Plantain Fritters

Tostones are essentially a fritter made from green plantains.

They are a popular side dish and snack in many Latin-American countries, and may sometimes be called Patacones.

Essentially, they are twice-fried green plantains, and they can provide both a tasty starchy side and an appetizing crunch to many dishes.

I love to serve them as a starchy side, but I also serve them as a snack in their own right, sometimes with a dipping sauce, in much the same way as chips would be served.  They are also very good with soup.

To make these, you do need the plantains to be fairly green – if they are turning yellow, they will not be starchy enough, and your tostones would turn out mushy rather than crisp and crunchy.  If you have plantains that are more yellow than green, try making my caramelized sweet plantains instead!

I like The Paleo Mom’s video on green plantains, although I do not peel and cut them in the same way as she does if I am making tostones.

But if you can get your hands on some green plantains (and the greener the better really for these!) consider giving these a go!

In most Latin American countries, they use a special tool called a tostonera to flatten the plantains after their first frying – I have found that 2 cutting boards does the job perfectly well…  all you need is something with a smooth flat surface so that you can press the chunks of plantain into flat discs.

These are both paleo and AIP-friendly.

These Tostones were made by A while I took the photographs of her cooking them.

Don’t be afraid of this recipe serving 4-6, it is easy to make less by simply using fewer plantains.  But I suspect that once yo try these, you will want to make the full amount and keep the leftovers for snacks or other meals as they are so versatile.

Tostones – Green Plantain Fritters

Serves 4-6

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  • 3-4 green plantains (get the greenest ones you can)
  • coconut oil or lard for frying
  • sea salt to season

The first thing you need to do is to peel the plantains – this can be a little tricky sometimes, especially when they are very green.  You do need them to stay in the round, so you cannot peel them in the same way that The Paleo Mom did in the above video.

What I tend to do is to cut the bottom and top off each plantain.  I then cut them in half.

Next I cut a long slit along the entire length of the plantain, and I pries as much of the peel off as I can using my thumb.  This can be tricky, but be patient and eventually you will get most of it off.  If any bits of peel remain, just use a knife to cut them off.

Once all your plantains are peeled, you need to cut them in chunks – We tend to go for somewhere between ½ and ¾ of an inch – the thicker you cut them at this stage, the bigger your tostones will be  when done, so if you want small thin tostones (more like a chip), cut them smaller, if you want thicker, bigger tostones (more like a fritter), cut them bigger.

Heat the coconut oil or lard in a large skillet over a medium high heat.

Once it is hot, working in batches, cook the plantains until golden brown on both sides.  They don’t have to be completely cooked through at this stage -you are just aiming for an attractive brown colour.

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Remove the plantains from the pan and cook the remaining chunks in batches.

Once all the plantain chunks are cooked you need to start reheating the oil back to medium-high.

Place one plantain chunk on a cutting board and put a second cutting board on top.

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Apply pressure to the top board to squish it flat – how much pressure you use is up to you.

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Light pressure results in a thicker tostone that is more like a fritter (better for serving with soups or as a side), more pressure results in a thinner, crisper tostone that will more resemble a chip.

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Of course if you could get your hands on a tostonera you would use that in place of the 2 cutting boards.  I have never tried this with a tortilla press, but I wonder if that might work as well – if you have one and try it, please let me know!

Once all your plantains are flatened you can start cooking the tostones.

Place a few in the heated fat in the skillet, being careful not to over-crowd it – these need to be cooked in batches to achive crispness.

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Cook over a medium-high heat for a few minutes each side until golden brown and crispy.

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Remove, transfer to a plate and sprinkle with a little sea salt.  Continue until all the tostones are cooked.

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These can be served hot or cold as a starchy side, as a snack or even as a chip with some dips.

Shared at Gluten Free Fridays #99

Shared at Real Food Fridays #46

Grilled Shrimp With Mango, Strawberry, Avocado Salsa

It has been so hot here lately that I am not going to apologize for the large number of recipes that I am posting that use an outdoor grill – there is no way I am wanting to turn the stove on right now!

If you don’t have a grill, all the recipes I have been posting  could certainly be cooked in a skillet or under the broiler.  I am sure they would taste just as good.

One of my favourite things to cook on a grill is shrimp.  And shrimp also happens to be a very economical seafood, which is why we eat it quite a lot.

These grilled shrimp were just delicious.  I marinated them for a short time in a mixture of lime juice, honey and garlic which gave them a wonderful flavour, and the honey contributed to the caremelization on the surface.

I served these on top of a mango and strawberry salsa, meaning that the entire recipe is AIP friendly and suitable for the elimination phase of AIP.

If you are not AIP and can handle some chili, a chopped jalapeno chili would be wonderful in the salsa!

Grilled Shrimp with Mang0-Strawberry-Avocado Salsa

Serves 6

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For the grilled shrimp:

  • 2lb large shrimp – peeled and deveined
  • ¼ cup lime juice
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp avocado oil
  • 2 cloves garlic – crushed
  • 1 tbsp freshly grated root ginger
  • sea salt to taste

For the mango, strawberry, avocado salsa:

  • 1 cup strawberries – hulled and chopped
  • 1 large ripe mango – peeled, stoned and chopped
  • 1 ripe avocado – peeled, stoned and chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 2 green onions – chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic – crushed
  • 1 tbsp freshly grated root ginger
  • sea salt to taste
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Zest and juice of 1 lime

The first thing you need to do is to take some wooden or bamboo skewers and soak them in cold water for a couple of hours – this will stop them from burning on the grill.

Place the lime juice, honey, fish sauce, olive oil, garlic, ginger and salt in a pan and bring to a simmer.  Cook for 5 minutes then leave to cool.

Divide the marinade in half, and pour one half over the shrimp.  Cover and refrigerate for half to one hour.  Keep the remaining half of the marinade to one side to use as a glaze.

While the shrimp is marinading, make the salsa.

Chop the mango, strawberries and avocado into evenly sized pieces and place them in a bowl.  Add the cilantro, green onions, lime zest, ginger and garlic, and season well with salt.  Mix well then pour over the olive oil and lime juice.  Give it all one final mix then store in the fridge until needed.

When ready to cook the shrimp, preheat the grill to medium hot.

Thread the shrimp onto the soaked bamboo skewers (I like to use 2 skewers for each as they hold the shrimp securely and makesthem easier to turn).

Grill the shrimp for 2-3 minutes per side, brushing well with the reserved marinade.

Remove from the grill once the shrimp is pink and opaque and serve at once with mango, strawberry, avocado salsa.

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I like to put a bed of lettuce on a plate, top this with the salsa and then sit the shrimp skewers on top.

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I served this with some tostones made from green plantains.

Shared at Paleo AIP Recipe Roundup #34

Shared at Gluten Free Fridays #99

Shared at Real Food Fridays #46

Mackerel with a Green Herb Sauce

Mackerel are one of my favourite fish, and they are very economical to buy as well, which helps a lot with our ever-increasing grocery bills.

I can buy 6 whole fish (frozen from an Asian grocery store) for less than $10 which is a very good price for a wild-caught fish.

I am not worried about buying frozen fish as it does not change the nutritional profile, and most of the time they are frozen within minutes of being caught.  In fact, it might even be healthier to buy fish that has been frozen on the boat as opposed to fish that may have taken several days to be shipped to where you live.  Freezing may affect the texture, especially if they have been frozen for long periods or stored improperly.  But it is very difficult to buy fresh wild-caught fish in Alberta – most of the so called “fresh” fish in the stores has been previously frozen and then thawed for sale.

Mackerel are an oily fish, rich in those all-important omega 3 fatty acids, so I try to include them in our diet at least once a week.  They are also a good source of protein, phosphorus, Vitamin D, Niacin, Vitamin B12 and Selenium.

I usually prepare them using this method, but this time round I decided to fillet them using this method.  I didn’t get any photographs as hubby was not at home to take them for me, and my hands were covered in fish which I did not want to get all over the camera.

Next time I will though!

If thawing frozen fish, make sure you do so in the refrigerator or under cold running water.  NEVER thaw them on the countertop as that can lead to the growth of bacteria resulting in food poisoning.

If you can obtain fresh, unfrozen mackerel, you can still use them to make this recipe.

The green herb sauce has an Italian feel to it and really complements the oily fish.

This recipe is not only Paleo, it is also AIP friendly, and is incredibly quick to cook, taking only 10 minutes in the oven.

Mackerel with a Green Herb Sauce

serves 6

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  • 6 mackerel – thawed if frozen and divided into 2 fillets using this method
  • 1-2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt to taste

For the green herb sauce:

  • ¼ cup capers – rinsed, drained and chopped
  • 3 green onions – roughly chopped
  • 1 cup fresh Italian parsley
  • ¼cup fresh basil leaves
  • ¼tbsp apple cider vinegar (try to use one with a mother – this is the brand I like)
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F.

Fillet your mackerel into 2 neat fillets using the method above, and lay them out on a rimmed baking sheet.  Drizzle with a little olive oil and then scatter with sea salt..

Bake in the preheated oven for around 10 minutes until the fish is firm and flakes easily.  Do not allow to overcook!

To make the green herb sauce you just put all the ingredients into a food processor or blender and process until the herbs are chopped and it is all evenly mixed.

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Serve the sauce drizzled over your mackerel.

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I served this with oven roasted rutabaga fries and oven roasted broccoli.

30 AIP (Auto-Immune Protocol) Paleo Breakfast Ideas

Breakfast – it is sometimes called the most important meal of the day.

All too often it is also the most rushed meal of the day – a quick bite before you rush out of the house to go to work or take the kids to school.

For many people, it consists of eggs and bacon, a muffin, toast, coffee, a bowl of cereal with milk, a danish or a donut grabbed from a coffee house on the way to work.  Which is great except when you are paleo or even worse following the Auto-immune protocol to heal your body and fix a leaky gut.

Most conventional breakfast ideas are full of sugar, gluten and grains and dairy and many paleo breakfasts consist of eggs and many other things that you cannot eat on a strict AIP protocol.

“What can I eat for breakfast?”  I see this question raised a lot on message boards, forums and even facebook.

Here are 30 AIP breakfast ideas to help you out.  Some are quicker than others, but all are delicious and 100% AIP compliant.  They are also all paleo, gluten, egg and dairy free.

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  1. Homemade Sausage Patties.  This is what I eat for breakfast most often, served with a side of homemade sauerkraut and a mug of homemade bone broth.
  2. A green smoothie
  3. A smoothie made from coconut milk, frozen berries and either banana or avocado.  Add some gelatin for extra protein.
  4. Beef sausage patties
  5. Green Plantain Pancakes served with berries and/or maple syrup
  6. Paleo Autoimmune Granola
  7. Bacon Avocado and Mushrooms
  8. Berry Gelatin Pudding (pictured above)
  9. Ground Beef Hash
  10. Faux-tmeal (Paleo Oatmeal) – omit the nut topping and top with fresh or frozen berries
  11. Apple sauce topped with coconut cream or coconut milk
  12. Paleo Breakfast Cookies
  13. AIP Paleo Pancakes serve with berries and/or maple syrup
  14. Coconut milk yoghurt served with berries
  15. A breakfast skillet made from whatever you have in the fridge
  16. Butternut squash (or pumpkin) porridge
  17. Paleo sticky buns
  18. Banana crepes – roll with berries and coconut cream
  19. Breakfast sausage with hash browns
  20. leftovers from the night before (who says you have to eat breakfast foods for breakfast?)
  21. Sweet caramelized plantains (omit the nutmeg if strict AIP)
  22. Bubble and squeak (omit the fried egg if strict AIP)
  23. Chicken liver pate spread on veggie slices or stuffed into a celery stick and topped with raisins or capers to make an AIP “Ants on a Log”
  24. Soup, soup, soup (omit the nutmeg in the last one if strict AIP)
  25. AIP plantain wraps – just fill with your favourite ingredients – I like to add leftover shredded meat, some veggies and guacamole
  26. Flaked canned fish with salad greens (I like a mixture of spinach, watercress and arugula) drizzled with olive oil and lemon juice
  27. A quick breakfast stirfry made from leftover cooked meat, bacon, mushrooms, green onions and any other veggies you can find
  28. Egg-free paleo macaroons
  29. Smoked salmon or leftover gravlax with salad greens dressed with olive oil and lemon and a little avocado.  Serve with some lacto-fermented relish if you have some.
  30. Banana zucchini bread spread with a little dairy-free paleo butter

What do you like to eat for breakfast?

Shared at Gluten Free Wednesday

Shared at Allergy Free Wednesday

Shared at Pennywise Platter Thursday 73

Shared at Gluten Free Fridays #98

Turmeric Coconut Cod With Mushrooms

While shopping at the farmers market the other day I came across this:

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Fresh turmeric roots.  This is the stuff that is dried and then ground up into that yellow powder that you use in cooking.

Turmeric is the spice that gives curry it’s yellow colour, and it has been used in India as both a spice and a medicinal herb for thousands of years.

Turmeric contains curcumin, which is a powerful anti-inflammatory and it is also an antioxidant, meaning that it is something worth considering including in your diet.

I decided to use some of my turmeric roots in a sauce that I paired with cod that I had in the freezer.

This recipe is gluten and dairy free, and is Paleo and AIP-friendly.

Turmeric Coconut Cod with Mushrooms

serves 6

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  • 6 fillets of cod – thawed if frozen
  • 1 onion – chopped
  • 2 cups mushrooms – sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic – crushed
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 oz fresh turmeric (if you only have dried turmeric use 1 tsp)
  • 2-3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • sea salt

Preheat the oven to 175°C/350°F.

Heat the coconut oil in a skillet and add the onion.  Saute for a few minutes until it is starting to soften.  Add the mushrooms and garlic and continue cooking until the mushrooms and onion are tender.

Meanwhile, peel the turmeric and chop it up into small pieces – it will stain, so be careful.  Place the turmeric in a blender with the coconut milk and season it with some salt.  Blend until smooth and bright yellow in colour.

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Place the fish in a shallow oven-safe dish in one layer and season it with salt.

Once the mushrooms and onions are cooked, scatter them over the fish.

Pour the turmeric and coconut milk mixture evenly over the fish and scatter it with parsley.

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Bake in the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes until the fish is opaque and flakes easily.

Serve at once with the yellow sauce poured over.

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I served this on a bed of sauteed kale, along with sliced tomatoes and lacto-fermented carrots.  The tomatoes are not Elimination Stage AIP as they are a nightshade.  Tomatoes are a stage 4 reintroduction.  This was Hubby’s plate of food, and he is not AIP and has no problems with eating tomatoes.  If you cannot tolerate tomatoes, simply leave them off your plate.

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It was delicious, and looked so pretty on the plate.

Shared at Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable #32

Shared at Full Plate Thursday

Shared at Real Food Wednesday

Shared at Waste Not Want Not Wednesday #78

Shared at Pennywise Platter Thursday 73

Pork and Apple Meatballs with Ginger Sauce and Daikon “Noodles”

I made pork and apple meatballs for dinner.  And because I added ginger for flavour, I decided that I would make an Asian inspired ginger sauce to serve with them.

And at that point it seemed natural to make daikon “noodles” using my new spiral slicer (Hubby bought it for me for my birthday).

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This recipe is Paleo, and is AIP-freindly.

I do need to get a coloured plate for taking photographs – taking a picture of white vegetables on a white plate does not work so well!  Despite that, this was very tasty…

Pork and Apple Meatballs with Ginger Sauce and Daikon “Noodles”

Serves 4-6

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For the meatballs:

  • 2lb ground pork
  • 1 small onion – finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic – crushed
  • 1 grated apple
  • 1″ piece of root ginger – peeled and grated
  • 1 tsp sage
  • sea salt to taste

For the ginger sauce:

  • 2 large carrots – grated
  • ½ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 4 green onions – chopped
  • ¼ cup avocado oil

For the daikon “noodles”

  • 1 large daikon – cut into “noodles” using a spiral slicer or mandolin
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil

The first thing you need to do is make the meatballs.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F.

Mix all of the meatball ingredients together, and roll into small balls about the size of a large walnut.  Place the meatballs on a rimmed baking sheet as you make them.

Place the meatballs in an oven-proof dish and bake them in the oven for 45-50 minutes until golden brown and cooked through.

While the meatballs are cooking, make the carrot-ginger sauce.  Place all the ingredients except for the avocado oil in a food processor.  Puree to a smooth paste.  While the machine is running, dribble in the avocado oil.

Once the meatballs are cooked, pour the sauce over the meatballs.  Return the dish to the oven for 10 minutes to heat the sauce.

Make the daikon “noodles”, then melt the coconut oil in a large skillet or wok.  Add the “noodles” and toss them until they are heated through.

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Serve the meatballs and sauce on top of a nest of the “noodles”.