Bacon, Beet and Fruit Salad – AIP/Paleo

I have been eating a lot of salads lately because I have been getting so many wonderful greens from the CSA that I am a member of.

The last week’s haul included arugula, lettuce, and some baby mustard greens, along with some beets (both red and yellow).  There was a ton of other stuff as well – potatoes, kohlrabi, kale and rhubarb.  I also bought some fruit – blueberries and some sugar plums.

I thought I would share with you a salad that I made using some of the greens, the beets and some of the fruit.

bbfs1

This is a hearty salad that is packed with summery flavour – perfect for a light lunch.

Bacon, Beet And Fruit Salad

serves 2

BBFS3

  • 2 medium beets – peeled and diced (I used one red beet and one yellow beet in this salad)
  • 4 slices bacon
  • 4 cups salad greens – torn (I used some of the arugula, mustard greens and lettuce)
  • 1 green apple – cored and chopped into bite-size pieces
  • 1 avocado  – peeled and diced
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • pinch of pink Himalayan salt
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).

Place the diced beets in a single layer in a small baking dish and place the bacon over the top.

Place the baking dish in the oven and roast for 15 minutes.

Toss the beets to coat them in the bacon fat that will have rendered out of the bacon.  Spread the contents out into a single layer.  Replace the dish in the oven and roast for another 15 minutes until the beets are tender and slightly browned and the bacon is crispy.

Allow the beets and bacon to cool, chopping the bacon into bite-size pieces.

Meanwhile, tear the salad greens into bite-size pieces and place in a salad bowl.

Toss the apple with the lemon-juice to prevent browning and add to the bowl along with the avocado, beets, bacon and blueberries

In a small bowl whisk together the white wine vinegar, salt and olive oil.   Pour over the salad and toss everything well.

Arrange the salad on 2 serving plates and serve at once.

BBFS4

This would make a good packed lunch or picnic dish if you took the dressing separately in a small jar and tossed it just before serving.

Shared at:  Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable

Carob Stuffed Strawberries – AIP/Paleo/Vegan

I made these beauties for a pot-luck I was attending earlier this month, and have only just got round to writing about them.

These are the perfect dessert or treat for summer…  ripe, seasonal fruit, a rich chocolatey flavoured filling and then a little bit of mint.

CSS1

Essentially, they are fresh, perfectly ripe strawberries that have been hollowed out and filled with the same choco-bananacado mousse that I have posted about a while back.  Then a mint sprig was added to simulate the green leaves. and provide a burst of freshness.

These are incredible and got devoured almost immediately.

They are 100% autoimmune protocol friendly, but are also vegan.  And they are very quick and easy to make.  If you can tolerate chocolate/cocoa, you could probably substitute the carob powder for some cocoa powder to make these really rich and chocolatey….

I am planning on making these again in a week or two’s time for another potluck…

Just an additional note – it is worth buying the best, ripest, strawberries you can find.  go for organic, local grown, really fresh… because if you don’t you won’t get the full strawberry flavour.  Who wants to eat insipid, out of season strawbs that have been flown halfway round the world, treated with pesticides and goodness knows what and taste of nothing!

I firmly believe that strawberries should be a seasonal treat – enjoy them while they are fresh and seasonal….

Carob Stuffed Strawberries

CSS3

Take the strawberries and wash them.  Then, using a small paring knife, cut the tops off and hollow out a small space in the top of the strawberries.  Don’t throw away your strawberry tops and the pieces you have cut away – save them and use them to make a strawberry infused water

Place the avocado, banana, carob powder, vanilla powder, coconut oil, honey and coconut cream in a food processor and puree the mixture until it is smooth and evenly mixed.

Use a plastic bag with the corner cut off, or a piping bag to pipe the carob/banana/avocado mixture into the hollows you cut in the strawberries.

You may have more of the mixture than you need to fill the strawberries – just transfer the extra to a dish and eat it later!

Top the carob filled strawberries with a mint sprig.

CSS2

Chill in the fridge to set the carob mixture.

These do need to be eaten relatively quickly, but will last a day or two in the fridge.

Shared at: Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable

60 Autoimmune Protocol Zucchini Recipes

I decided that I really NEED to get back to blogging on a regular basis.

And what better way to start again with a roundup of recipes from some of the amazing AIP bloggers out there.

Because it is the height of zucchini season right now, I decided that a round up of some of the best AIP-friendly zucchini recipes would be appropriate.  All these recipes are autoimmune friendly, and are a delicious way to use up the glut of zucchini…

canstockphoto0123819

Breakfast

Image by A Squirrel In The Kitchen

Image by A Squirrel In The Kitchen

Breakfast Hash Casserole – by A Squirrel In The Kitchen

Sunrise Hash – by Enjoying This Journey

Awesome Zucchini and Bacon Sautee – by Joanna Frankham

Appetizers And Snacks

Image by Sustainable Dish

Image by Sustainable Dish

Zucchini Pinwheels With Prosciutto And Basil – By Sustainable Dish

Roasted Garlic Zucchini – by Taste And See

Salty Zucchini Chips – by Life Made Full (make sure any additional spices you add are AIP compliant.  You could also add herbs)

Autoimmune Paleo Friendly Crackers – by Kaiku Lifestyle

Avo-Lemon-Dill-Dip – by The Paleo Partridge

Chicken And Zucchini Poppers – by One Lovely Life (omit the pepper and cumin if strict AIP)

Paleo Egg Rolls – by Forest And Fauna

Soups and Stews

zucchinisoup1

Zucchini Soup – by me

Silky Gingered Zucchini Soup – by Clothes Make The Girl (omit the black pepper if strict AIP)

Fragrant Herb and Chicken Soup – by Comfort Bites

Creamy Zucchini Mushroom Soup – by Paleo Leap (replace the ghee with coconut oil or another AIP compliant fat and omit the black pepper if strict AIP)

Paleo Chicken Noodle Soup – by How We Flourish

Roasted Garlic and Zucchini Soup – by In Sonnet’s Kitchen (omit the black pepper and optional diced tomato for strict AIP)

Main Course Dishes

image by Comfort Bites

image by Comfort Bites

Ginger Chicken With Courgette Noodles – by Comfort Bites

Garlic Shrimp Zucchini Pasta – by Sweet Potatoes and Social Change

Mason Jar Instant “Ramen” Noodles – by Strictly Delicious

Asian Pad-Thai Noodle Bowl – from Beyond The Bite (omit the sesame oil for strict AIP)

Turkey and Zucchini Lasagna with Sweet Potato Noodles – by He Won’t Know It’s Paleo

Bacon Zucchini Mushroom Stir-fry – by Paleo Magazine

Salmon Primavera – by Phoenix Helix

Stir-Fried Minced Pork With Bamboo Shoots and Zucchini – by Provincial Paleo

Bolognese Sauce With Chicken Livers And Zoodles – by Healing Family Eats

Zucchini Noodles With Scallops And Bacon – by Meatified (omit the black pepper if strict AIP)

Bolognese Sauce With Chicken Livers And Zoodles – Healing Family Eats

Pulled Pork And Zoodles – by Comfort Bites

PBR2

Pork Belly Ramen – by me

Chicken Piccata With Zucchini Noodles – by Strictly Delicious

Autoimmune Protocol Meatloaf – by Autoimmune Paleo

Zucchini Canoes – by Petra8Paleo

Zucchini Love Boats – by Slightly Lost Girl

Scallops With Bacon, Courgetti And Lime – by Comfort Bites

Salmon Cakes – by The Paleo Partridge

Hot Crispy Pork Belly With Zucchini Coins – by Petra8paleo

Hidden Liver Meatballs – by Provincial Paleo

Spanakopita Pie – by Petra8paleo

Zucchini Burger – by Enjoying This Journey

Sides

Image by Phoenix Helix

Image by Phoenix Helix

Melted Zucchini and Onions – by Phoenix Helix

Marvellous Minted Zucchini And Broccoli Rice – by Joanna Frankham

Zucchini Spaghetti – by Empowered Sustenance

Bacon-Basil Zucchini “Pasta” by The Paleo Mom (omit the optional walnuts for strict AIP)

Lemon Parsley Grilled Zucchini – by Against All Grain (omit the ground pepper if strict AIP)

Minted Zucchini – by The Paleo Mom

Marinated Summer Vegetables – by Don’t Eat The Spatula

Marinated Garlic Zucchini –  by Life Made Full (Make sure the Herbs de Provence are AIP compliant)

Zucchini And Caremelized Turmeric – by Petra8Paleo

Zucchini Fettuccine With Rosemary Butternut Creme Sauce – by In Sonnet’s Kitchen

Smoked Salmon Salad With Zucchini Noodles – by A Squirrel In The Kitchen

Zucchini Noodles With Nut And Seed Free Pesto – by Kaiku Lifestyle (omit the optional black pepper for Strict AIP)

Garlic Rosemary Zoodles – by Enjoying This Journey

Roasted Vegetables – by Joanna Frankham

Broiled Zucchini – by Nom Nom Paleo (omit black pepper and ghee for strict AIP)

Shaved Zucchini and Mint Salad – by Eat Drink Paleo (omit the black pepper and optional parmesan for strict AIP)

Treats, Baking and Deserts

Image by For Eat's Sake

Image by For Eat’s Sake

Zucchini Bread – from For Eat’s Sake

Banana Zucchini Bread/Cake/Muffins – by The Saffron Girl (omit the optional cardamom for strict AIP)

Carob Zucchini Milkshake – by Rias Recipes

Zucchini Bread – by For Eat’s Sake

Other

CZC4

Cauliflower and Zucchini “Cheese” – by me

AIP/Paleo Zucchini “Cheese” With Fresh Parsley – by A Squirrel In The Kitchen

Zucchini Cheese – by Gutsy By Nature

AIP Zucchini Pesto Sauce – by Sweet Potatoes And Social Change

Wow that is a lot of recipes! Now are you going to tell me that you do not know how to use all the zuchs from your garden?

First CSA of the Year – and why you should use a CSA

I haven’t posted in a while, but I just HAD to share with you all my little haul from the first CSA of the year.

FMH1

I went with a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) from Eagle Creek Farms.

In case you have never heard of a CSA and do not know how it works, this is a basic description.

Prior to the start of the growing season, you sign up for the CSA – either a half share (which is what I did – designed to feed 2-3 people) or a full share, or any combination of these.  What you will need will depend very much on how many veggies you eat and how big your family is.

The farmers then start growing their crops based on the number of people who have signed up for a CSA.

Basically, you are providing the funds up front to enable the farmer to buy the necessary seeds and to pay for the labour needed to bring that crop to harvest.  Essentially you are buying shares in the crops that they will be harvesting in the future, and come time when they are ripe, you get a share of those crops, usually in a weekly or bi-weekly delivery, depending on the particular CSA you signed up for.

BTW did you know that there are CSA’s for everything from fresh veggies (the kind I signed up for) through to fruit ones.  There are even CSA’s for grass-fed meat, dairy produce (raw dairy included in areas where it is legal), eggs and grains (if you eat them)….  google CSA [your local area] to find ones local to you!   Obviously not all of these CSA’s may be seasonal, but many are.  There are also Winter CSA shares that you can buy that rely on stored root veggies and the few winter crops that can be grown (seasonality depends on location).

And some CSA’s include non-perishable items like fermented veggies or preserves.  The one I use includes the occasional bunch of flowers which is always nice to receive.  The bunch I collected today is in my bedroom where I can enjoy if without the cats destroying it!

So the downside of a CSA?

There is some risk with this – crops can and do fail.  But it is very unusual for a farmer who offers a CSA to only grow one crop.  And if one fails (for example the carrot harvest), others are likely to make up for it.  They also often carry out subsequent plantings of seeds, so that if one crop fails, a later one may succeed and provide a good harvest.

In addition, often you do not get much choice as you get what is ripe and ready to harvest when you go to the pick-up point.  (very few CSA’s deliver to your house, although some do.  The ones I have seen local to me all have pick-up/drop-off points at various farmers markets around the city).  Some do offer a limited choice – the one I use does.  It works on the simple method of “take one item from each bin”, and where there is a choice, the bin will contain one or more items that you can choose from.  If you are strict AIP, you will almost certainly receive some items you cannot eat yourself….  but then again, you may also be able to trade or gift them with someone (a neighbour, a friend or a family member)

Also, because this is a seasonal thing, you are only going to receive those veggies that are actually in season and ripe at the time.  This means in early summer you get a TON of greens, but in the fall/autumn you will get a TON of roots – plan accordingly!  We cannot cheat Mother Nature!

So if there are risks involved, why should you sign up for a CSA?

Well first of all, it is supporting local farmers.  Usually, the produce you will be receiving will be either organic, or grown in a sustainable fashion, but either way, it is locally grown, and you can bet that it is always in season.  And then there is the chance to go to the farmers market/collection point and actually MEET your farmer…

And these veggies are so fresh because they were picked if not that morning, probably the day before. Some of them may even be still “living” and have the roots intact or still planted in a pot! (Winter CSA’s are often different here, as they often involved stored veggies.)  And then when you add in the fact that you do not always know what you are going to be receiving, there is the element of surprise.

And it is FUN – you get to try veggies that you never knew would exist!  You can experiment!

As I said, today was the first CSA collection of the season (a week late because of the rain, hail and other bad weather we have been having in the Calgary region these last few weeks).  So I headed to Northland Mall to their Farmers Market to pick up my half-share.

For me, a half share works perfectly – for the most part I feed just myself due to my dietary issues,.  But I do like to share my bounty with my 2 wonderful housemates, so having a little bit extra works well.  I also eat far more veggies than the average person so a 2-3 person share probably means a 1-2 person share when it includes me!

This half share cost me $355, which I paid for back in March, and is designed to feed 2-3 people each week…  I figured that I would most likely spend more than $355 over the 16 weeks that this CSA will run – it only works out at around $22 a week.  I don’t know about you, but I normally spend FAR more than $22 a week on fresh produce!  And that is just for myself….  as the half-share I bought is designed to feed 2-3 people, I will have some leftover to share with my 2 housemates to earn myself a little bit of good-will (goodness knows I NEED it! – I OWE them a bundle for their boundless and freely given support)

And if all else fails, I will ferment, dry, freeze or otherwise preserve the veggies before they go bad.

So what did I get in my first CSA share (bear in mind, this is early in the season and only designed to feed 2-3 people for 1 week – this is a half-share, a full-share gets double this amount):

FMH1

 

Now this is a TON of nutrient dense greens!

At the back, we have a bunch of flowers (there was a choice of 2 different bunches – a welcome non-edible addition that made my heart sing!).  And also a small potted basil plant.

Then working from the far left-hand corner in a clockwise direction, I received:

  • a large bag of pea shoots
  • a small bag of lambs quarters greens
  • horseradish greens (with itty, bitty baby horseradish roots attached)
  • garlic scrapes
  • cilantro
  • purple kale (this was a HUGE bunch!)

Lots of greens as you can see, which is hardly surprising seeing that this is very early in the growing season in Calgary.  This is what I mean when I say that you have very little control or choice because you are getting what is ready and seasonal at the time of collection.  And at this point in the growing season, in Calgary, that means greens.

But I seriously LOVE greens, so all is good in my world!

For what it is worth, I could choose between the garlic scrapes and a single bulb of young garlic (I chose garlic scrapes simply because I have never eaten them and am always open to new fthings), and between the kale and collard greens (I went with the kale because it was a bigger bunch!)

There are some very new items here – some I have never eaten but am excited to try.  I have never had lambs quarters, horseradish greens or garlic scrapes.

I will need to test out the pea-shoots, but I suspect that they will be OK – I ate a few on the bus on the way home (they just looked so fresh, tasty and appetizing!) and I have had no reaction to them 5 hours later.

The flowers and the basil plant (small, but he will grow!) were a welcome surprise.

After collecting these, I went for a walk around the market and bought myself a few other bits:

FMH2

At the back – organic strawberries

Then clockwise from the far left:

  • organic arugula
  • the cutest, freshest radishes (I plan to use both the greens and the radishes)
  • some of the most flavourful blueberries I have ever tasted
  • a huge bag of wondefully ripe cherries

These last purchases cost me less than $20, so I am one happy bunny….

So that is my farmers market haul…

total costs:

  • CSA share (divided between 16 weeks) – $22
  • extra items – $17:50 (the stuff in the second picture)

Not bad as all of this will be shared beween 3 people!

So will anyone tell me that eating local is not affordable try visiting your local farmers

Basic Mixed Salad With Balsamic Vinaigrette (AIP)

I realized that I have never posted about the basic salad that I eat with almost every single meal that I make…

This recipe is 100% AIP with a balsamic vinaigrette dressing.

You can vary the salad ingredients to include anything that you like to have in your salad – no need to stick to the vegetables that I have suggested here – I often vary them depending on what I have available and what is seasonal.

These ingredients are just a suggestion.

To make this recipe low-fodmap, simply omit the green onions and don’t use the suggestion of garlic in the vinaigrette dressing.

The vinaigrette cannot be made low histamine as given, but you could replace the balsamic vinegar with fresh lemon juice.

This recipe keeps well in the fridge for several days – just add the balsamic vinaigrette as needed.  I often make a big batch of salad, and store the dressing in a jar in the fridge.  I will serve myself a portion of salad as needed and then drizzle over a little dressing, toss it and eat it.

Basic Mixed Salad

serves 4-6


burgersaladguac14

  • ½ head romaine lettuce – chopped
  • ½ head green or red leaf lettuce – chopped
  • 1 small daikon radish – peeled and grated
  • 3 large carrots – peeled and grated
  • 4 green onions – chopped (omit this if low-FODMAP)
  • ½ english cucumber – chopped
  • Balsamic vinaigrette (recipe below)

This recipe is very simple to make.  Peel the daikon and carrots and grate them into a bowl (you could also chop or julienne them if you prefer).  Chop the 2 types of lettuce, the onions and the cucumber.

Place all the ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.  I find that my hands are the best tool to do this as it does not bruise the salad greens/lettuce.

basicsalad

 

At this stage, the salad can be stored in a covered bowl or storage container in the fridge for a few days.   But like all raw/fresh ingredients, it is better if you serve it fresh.

Just before serving, toss with the balsamic vinaigrette (recipe below) and serve at once.

In the picture below, I served this salad with a simple grilled burger and a large dollop of guacamole.

burgersaladguac14

 

Basic Balsamic Vinaigrette

makes ¼ cup (enough for a salad for 4-6 people)

balsamicvinagrette

This dressing is the epitomy of simplicity.

All you do is add the balsamic vinegar to a small glass jar.  Add the olive oil and season to taste with sea salt.

Shake well and use to dress your salads immediately before serving.

It can be kept in the fridge for several days, but will need to be allowed to come up to room temperature before mixing as the olive oil may solidify.

This recipe can be varied by adding garlic (do not add this if low-FODMAP) or fresh or dried herbs.  I like to add fresh thyme and oregano.  If adding fresh herbs use right away.

You could also replace the balsamic vinegar with any vinegar of your choice or even any citrus juice.  To make this recipe low histamine, I recommend freshly squeezed lemon juice in place of the balsamic vinegar.

The extra virgin olive oil can also be replaced with any oil that you prefer as well.  Nut and seed oils are not AIP, but avocado oil is and makes a delicious vinagrette.

Bone Marrow Poutine – AIP/Paleo/Gluten-Free/Dairy-Free

Poutine is a comfort food dish that originated in Quebec, Canada.  It consists of fries, gravy and cheese curds, and is a common fast-food dish found throughout Canada.

In honour of the week of April 18 – 25 2015 being Calgary’s Poutine Week, I decided that I was going to cook an Autoimmune Protocol version of this classic Canadian dish to share with my 2 housemates.

BMP1

I had been thinking about recreating this dish for a long time – several months at least, and Poutine Week seemed the ideal time to make it.

Of course, seeing that I am both Celiac and allergic to dairy, and I am also practicing the AIP (Autoimmune Protocol), an anti-inflammatory and intestinal healing lifestyle,  I needed to make a poutine that I could also eat…  and that meant that the traditional poutine of French-fries, flour-thickened gravy and cheese curds was totally out of the question.

I decided that white (Japanese) sweet potato fries would make a perfect substitute for the (nightshade containing) french-fries.  The gravy was a fairly easy substitute to make – I made a rich onion gravy similar to my Simple Gravy recipe that was thickened with tapioca starch, and flavoured with caramelized red onion and beef bone broth.

The cheese curds were substituted with cubes of my Cauliflower and Zucchini “Cheese” that I posted about yesterday.

CZC6

This cheese tastes like a mild cheddar or processed cheese.  And while it cannot compare to the texture of the traditional “squeaky” cheese curds, it does still add that mild cheese flavour.  The heat of the sweet potato fries and the gravy melts the cheese slightly and makes it taste oh so rich….  Think of all those poutines you ate that had mozzarella and other melty mild-tasting cheese added.  That is what this one is like!

And then, “just because I could”, I added some grass-fed beef bone marrow to add extra flavour and richness.

If you don’t like the idea of eating bone marrow, you could easily leave it out, and this dish will still be good….  in fact, if you did this, and used vegetable broth in place of the bone broth and agar while making the “cheese”, this could be a vegan dish!

But if you can obtain some marrow bones, I really urge you to give this a try with the marrow included – it really does add to the flavour.  And bone marrow is very nutritious – full of “brain-feeding” healthy fats.  And really, what is more decadent than a bone marrow poutine!

The best bit about this recipe is that if you have made the “cheese” in advance, you can have it ready in under 1 hour….

Serve this next time you have friends over to watch the hockey, and you will have very happy friends!  In fact, get yourself organized and you could have this cooking during the first period, and serve it while everyone is waiting for the second period to start!  Perfect food for the Stanley Cup Playoffs!

AIP Bone Marrow Poutine

serves 2-3

BMP4

    • 2-3 medium sweet potatoes (If you use the white Japanese sweet potatoes your poutine will appear more authentic, but the ruby/orange ones work just as well)
    • 3-4 tbsp fat of choice – melted if necessary (beef tallow, lard, bacon fat, coconut oil or olive oil would all be good choices)
    • Pink Himalayan Salt to taste
    • 2-3 lb cross-cut beef marrow bones (aprox 6-8 bones in total) – preferably from grass-fed beef
    • 1 red onion – peeled, halved and sliced
    • 2 cloves garlic – peeled and minced
    • 1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves
    • 1 quart beef bone broth – preferably homemade
    • 1 Tbsp Coconut Aminos or other soy sauce substitute
    • 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
    • 2 Tbsp Tapioca Flour
    • 3 slices Homemade Dairy-Free “Cheese” – cubed

The first thing that you are going to do is to preheat your oven to 400°F (200°C).

Peel the sweet potatoes, and cut them into fat fries – you really do not want skinny shoe-string fries here!  Place the fries in a bowl and toss with 2-3 tbsp of the fat you have chosen (melt the fat first if it is a solid type).  Season with salt, and spread the fries out in a single layer on 1-2 rimmed baking sheets.

Place the sweet potato fries in the oven, and set the timer for 15 minutes.

Place the marrow bones upright in a rimmed roasting tin:

RBM5

Place the roasting tin with the marrow bones in the oven below the sweet potato fries.

While the fries and bones are cooking, prepare the gravy – melt the remaining 1-2 tbsp of fat in a heavy based pan over a medium heat.

Add the onion and sautee until caramelized and browned.  Add the garlic and thyme and cook for 1-2 minutes.  Now pour in the bone broth and simmer for 10-15 minutes.

When the timer goes off, take the sweet potato fries out of the oven and toss well.  Return them to the oven and set the timer for a further 15 minutes.

Add the balsamic vinegar and coconut aminos to the pan with the onion and broth, and simmer for another 10-15 minutes.  You want the liquid to reduce by about a third…

When the oven timer goes off again, remove the sweet potato fries and bone marrow from the oven and allow them to rest for 5-10 minutes while finishing the gravy.

RBM4

Use as stick blender to puree the gravy to a smooth consistency.

Take the tapioca flour and mix with a little cold water to make a slurry.  Mix this slurry into the gravy, and bring to the boil.  Reduce the heat and simmer until thickened.

Taste and season as necessary with salt.

To assemble an individual portion of the Poutine…

Place a portion of the sweet potato fries in the bottom of an individual serving dish.

Scoop the bone marrow out of 2 of the roasted marrow bones and use to top the fries – don’t worry if it breaks up – that is fine…  Just don’t waste any.  You may need to use a small knife to cut around the bone cavity to release the bone marrow (if it comes out in one long piece chop it up before adding it to the fries in the dish!).  If the bones are too narrow, use a chop-stick or metal skewer to poke it out… just get as much out as you can! (Reserve the bones for making bone broth).  Make sure you either add any of the fat that comes out of the bone marrow to this dish or save it for future uses – it is a really nutritious fat.

Scatter some of the homemade dairy-free cheese cubes over the fries, and top with a generous ladle full of the gravy….

BMP3

Serve at once before the “cheese” has melted…

BMP2

It is worth bearing in mind that this is an incredibly rich dish, and it is very filling… the small amount shown in the picture above is roughly what each of us managed to eat – me and my 2 housemates (both of them guys)…  we all felt incredibly satisfied after eating it…. But not uncomfortably full… this stuff gets into your brain and just tells it that “I have eaten enough”…  bone marrow and the gelatin in the bone broth and cheese does that to you!  It is so incredibly nutritious that you really do not need to eat huge portions.

I would love to know if you try this recipe and what you thought of it…. and please, PLEASE!  give it a try with the bone marrow at least once!

Shared at: Simply Natural Saturday, Corn Free Every Day, Hearth and Soul Hop, Tasty Tuesdays, AIP Paleo Recipe Roundtable

Cauliflower and Zucchini “Cheese” – AIP/Paleo Vegan Option

Homemade vegetarian/vegan cheese has been showing up all over Instagram and various websites thanks to a poster by the name of Haley Stobbs.

I needed to make some AIP friendly cheese as an ingredient in an artichoke and spinach dip (recipe coming soon!) for a Beltane potluck that I was attending, and naturally I turned to this type of cheese as dairy containing cheeses are out (not only are they not AIP, I have an anaphalactic dairy allergy for which I carry an epipen).  I also needed some “cheese” for another recipe that I was planning on making – an AIP Poutine…

CZC6

As I did not have many zucchini, and I also wanted to give this cheese a little more “substance” than the original recipe had, I decided to use some steamed cauliflower as well.

While this recipe does not taste exactly like aged cheddar cheese (I doubt you could ever achieve that in a non-dairy form!), it does have a pleasantly cheesy flavour – like a mild cheddar or a processed cheese…

And HEY!  It is a “cheese” that I can eat without needing to use my Epipen and ending up in Emergency…

CZC2

Nutritional yeast gives this “cheese” it’s flavour.  The way that nutritional yeast is produced makes it safe for even people with SIBO or Candida overgrowth to consume.  I prefer to use this brand of nutritional yeast:

And the best bit?  It melts!

This cheese is 100% AIP, and can easily be made vegan by substituting agar flakes for the gelatin.  I actually did use agar when I made this for the potluck as I wanted my dip to be vegan.  I have also made it using Great Lakes Gelatin in order to take advantage of the gut healing properties that gelatin has.  Either way, it works well.

This is the gelatin that I use:

Cauliflower and Zucchini Cheese

makes 1 x loaf-tin sized block

CZC4

Place the cauliflower and zucchini in a steamer, and steam over simmering water for 8-10 minutes until tender.

Place the cauliflower and zucchini in a food processor and pulse until smooth.

Add the gelatin or agar powder while the puree is still hot and process until well mixed.

Add in the rest of the ingredients and mix well.

Pour the mixture into a loaf tin lined with parchment paper.

Chill in the fridge until well set.

Turn out the block of “cheese” and slice and use as needed…

CZC5

Optional:  Add fresh chopped herbs (I like to use parsley, thyme, oregano and basil) and finely chopped garlic to make a garlic and herb “cheese”.

GHC4

Shared at: Gluten Free FridaysReal Food Fridays, Lets Get Real Fridays, Simply Natural Saturday, Corn Free Every Day, Hearth and Soul Hop,  Tasty TuesdaysAIP Paleo Recipe Roundtable

Roasted Butternut Squash

This is one of the side dishes that I served along side the pork ribs that I made the other day.

DRibs1

Roasting butternut squash concentrates the sweetness, and the slight caremelizing on the outside gives it a delicious flavor.

This is a very easy way to cook squash, especially when you have the oven on for other things.

Roasted Butternut Squash

serves 4

RS1

  • 1 butternut squash – peeled, seeded and cut into 1″ cubes
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • sea salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).

Peel the squash, remove the seeds and cut it into 1″ cubes.

Toss the cubed squash with the olive oil and a little salt.

Place on a rimmed baking tray, and roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes until the squash is tender and starting to caramelize.

Serve at once

Shared at:  Fat Tuesday, Tasty TuesdaysGluten Free Wednesday, Allergy Free Wednesday, AIP Paleo Recipe RoundtableFull Plate Thursday

AIP Waldorf Salad – Nut Free

A Waldorf salad is usually made from celery, apples and walnuts, dressed with mayonnaise.

Because neither nuts or mayonnaise are allowed on the stricter version of the Autoimmune Protocol, I decided to modify the recipe so that it did not contain either of these ingredients.  I added cucumber and radishes to provide a bit of extra crunch, and in place of the mayonnaise, I used some of my homemade coconut milk yogurt.  This made it tangy and refreshing, and much lighter.  It also added some gut-friendly probiotics.

I served the salad on a bed of baby greens.

DRibs1

This recipe was one of the side dishes that I served with my AIP BBQ Ribs that I made the other day.

AIP Waldorf Salad

serves 2

WS1

  • 1 stick celery – diced
  • 1 granny smith apple – cored and diced
  • ½ cucumber – diced
  • 5 radishes – each cut into ½” chunks
  • ¼ cup coconut milk yogurt
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley – chopped
  • sea salt to taste
  • Baby spring greens to serve

Mix together the coconut milk yogurt, lemon juice and parsley.  Season to taste with sea salt.

Chop the celery, apple, cucumber and radishes into ½” chunks.

Mix the vegetables with the coconut yogurt dressing.

WS2

Serve the salad on a bed of baby greens.

Shared at: The Gathering Spot, Handmade Tuesdays, Tell Em Tuesday, Fat Tuesday, Tasty Tuesdays, Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, Allergy Free Wednesdays, Gluten Free Wednesday, AIP Paleo Recipe RoundtableFull Plate Thursday, Gluten Free FridaysReal Food Fridays, Lets Get Real Fridays

AIP Paleo Pork Ribs And AIP Spice Rub

I got a great deal on some pork ribs the other week, and they had been sat in the freezer waiting for me to come up with a recipe to use them.

I modified my Tasty Intercostals recipe, as the rub used on these ribs contained a lot of non-AIP spices.

Because of this, I created my own version of an AIP spice rub which I rubbed on the ribs before cooking them in the slow cooker on a bed of onions and apples.

The ribs were then finished under the broiler to crisp them up slightly and brown them, and I blitzed the liquid, apples and onions in the base of the slow cooker to use as a BBQ sauce.

RBBQ3

These were some really tender, delicious ribs, and the sauce was, in my opinion, the best part.  It was fruity, but also had a meaty, rich taste from the juices that had dripped out of the ribs as they were cooking.

If you prefer though, you could always use some of my Saskatoon Berry and Peach BBQ Sauce…  I bet that would taste wonderful too.

AIP Paleo Pork Ribs with BBQ Sauce

serves 4

RBBQ5

  • 2 racks baby-back pork ribs – preferably from pastured pork
  • 1 recipe AIP Spice Rub (below)
  • 1 large onion – peeled and sliced
  • 1 apple – peeled, cored and chopped
  • freshly squeezed juice 1 orange
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme – chopped

Cut each of the racks of ribs into half.

Liberally rub the spice mixture all over the ribs, ensuring that each surface is well coated.

Place the sliced onion and apple in the base of the slow-cooker, scatter with thyme and pour over the orange juice.

Sit the ribs on top.

Cover and cook on low for 8 hours.

Once the cooking time is up, preheat the broiler to high and place the ribs on a baking sheet.  Cook under the broiler until the ribs have crisped up and are nicely browned on both sides.

RBBQ4

Slice the ribs between the bones.

BBQ2

Using a stick blender, puree the contents of the slow cooker pot, and use this as a BBQ sauce to serve with the ribs.

BBQ1

RBBQ1

AIP Spice Rub

  • ½ tbsp Himalayan Salt
  • 2 tbsp granulated garlic
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano
  • 1 tbsp dried minced onion
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • ½ tsp turmeric

Mix all the ingredients together well using a spice grinder or food processor.  Use to liberally coat the ribs.  Store any unused rub in a glass airtight container.

DRibs1

I served the ribs with the BBQ sauce, roasted butternut squash and an AIP version of a waldorf salad.

Shared at: Mostly Homemade Mondays, Mouthwatering Monday, Hearth and Soul Hop, Simply Natural Saturday, The Gathering Spot, Handmade Tuesdays, Tell Em Tuesday, Fat Tuesday, Tasty Tuesdays, Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, Allergy Free Wednesdays, Gluten Free Wednesday, AIP Paleo Recipe RoundtableFull Plate Thursday, Gluten Free Fridays, Real Food Fridays, Lets Get Real Fridays