Bacon Braised Chard

This is the side dish that I served along side the beef-heart steaks.

BHdinn2

Chard is one of my favourite vegetables.  I love the flavour, but even more, I love how nutritious it is.

It a good source of Thiamin, Folate, Phosphorus and Zinc, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Copper and Manganese (1).

I love to add bacon when I am cooking greens – not only does the bacon provide more flavour, it also provides some healthy fats that help you absorb the fat-soluble nutrients.

Bacon Braised Chard

serves 2

BBC1

Trim the chard, cutting the stems into small bite-sized pieces and coarsely chopping the green leaves.

Put the bacon in a large, heavy skillet and cook until crispy and the fat has run out of it.

BFG1

Add the chard stems to the skillet and toss for 5 minutes until the stems are starting to soften.

Add the broth to the skillet and simmer for 2-3 minutes.

BFG3

Now add the green chard leaves.  Toss until most of the liquid has evaporated and the leaves have wilted.

BFG2

Taste and season with salt if necessary.

Depending on how salty your bacon is, you might not need much extra salt.

BFG4

Serve at once.

4 thoughts on “Bacon Braised Chard

    • I buy bacon from a local pastured pork supplier.
      It is very hard to find bacon without sugar as it is an integral part of the cure – I have been assured that there is very little sugar that actually remains in the bacon at the end of the curing process.
      Like wise, nitrates are usually an integral part of the curing process – even the “nitrate free” bacon uses celery juice which is naturally very high in nitrates. It is used to prevent the growth of undesirable bacteria, and also helps the bacon to remain an attractive pink colour. Where possible I buy bacon that has been cured with natural nitrates such as celery juice. But this is not to avoid nitrates in total, more because I prefer a more natural product. Apparently you consume more nitrates eating a stick of celery than you would eating a rasher of bacon…

    • I buy bacon from a local pastured pork supplier.
      It is very hard to find bacon without sugar as it is an integral part of the cure – I have been assured that there is very little sugar that actually remains in the bacon at the end of the curing process.
      Like wise, nitrates are usually an integral part of the curing process – even the “nitrate free” bacon uses celery juice which is naturally very high in nitrates. It is used to prevent the growth of undesirable bacteria, and also helps the bacon to remain an attractive pink colour. Where possible I buy bacon that has been cured with natural nitrates such as celery juice. But this is not to avoid nitrates in total, more because I prefer a more natural product. Apparently you consume more nitrates eating a stick of celery than you would eating a rasher of bacon…

      • Thank you! I have been told this, but I didn’t quite understand the process. I also rather have the natural process than anything else. I love bacon! Thank you for your feedback! -Shelly

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